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with lawmakers as lyndon johnson did. >> yeah, far guy who is so smart it really does puzzle me. perhaps jod city or john can answer as to why he just doesn't appreciate the fact that personal relationships matter in politics at every level always have going back to lincoln. look at spielberg's film. 2013 always will. he doesn't do it terribly well, maybe that's why he wants to suggest it doesn't matter. i agree with everything that jodi just said about some of the opportunities. i do think it's worrisome and not just a parochial matter. it's worrisome that they aren't bringing more people in not just because diversity of voices and views helps but some of these people are tired. some of these people-- particularly economic people-- they are spent, charlie. i wish there were -- you had this sense there was an infusion of fresh ideas and fresh blood. not to change views and change him but just to kind of bring more vital toy the tail rather than just get ready for the big fight. senator chuck schumer has a theory to go to al's point that he tells his colleagues which is that because president obam
instead of wanting to be magic johnson, he wants -- >> now the moan is beginning mark. charles schumer of new york, the chairman of the joint committee on inaugural ceremony. >> mr. president, mr. vice president. members of congress, all who are present, and to all who are watching, welcome to the capital and to his celebration of our great democracy. [applause] [cheering] >> this is the 57th inauguration of an american president. and no matter how many times one witnesses this event, it's simplicity, its innate majesty, and most of all, it's meaning, that sacred yet cautious entrusting of power from we the people to our chosen leader, never fails to make one's heart beat faster as it will today with the inauguration of president barack h. obama! [cheering] >> now, we know that we would not be here today where it not for those who stand guard around the world to preserve our freedom. to those in our armed forces, we offer our infinite thanks. for your bravery, your honor, your sacrifice. >> this democracy of ours was forged by intellect argument, by activism and blood. and, above all,
for being with us. >> we continue conversation wefawn johnson -- with don johnson and jennifer steinhauer. >> what is the moment you will remember? >> he expressed frustration about the gun hearings he's about to hold. it reflects the difficult position that he is in and the dynamic of the entire democratic caucus. there are a lot of members that come from red states or have a very moderate, pro-gun record. he is in a tough spot himself in terms of protecting and working with his members who are concerneou
a previous president, lyndon b. johnson. joining us is joe who served as a special assistant to lbj and a close adviser to president kennedy as well. he is the author of the awesomely titled what the approximately hell is a presidency for? >> making washington work, a new publication and he joins us now. i am endlessly fascinated with lbj and the life story and the 39s presidency. you can read these books and see the immediate change when jfk dies and lbj assumes the office, there is this bill install and he works his magic and the phones and gets his way on that and gets his way on the tax bill that kennedy couldn't get through. my question is when you look at the great skills and the talents that lbj had dealing with the senate and congress, do they really apply in the era of hyper polarization that we live in? the republican leader. does mitch mcconnell respond with the same? >> i think you have to remember that there was terrific polarization in the 1960s. the democratic party was in control of tourn democrats who were against the kifl rights bills and controlled the mitties. th
brother showing up. >> exactly. >> who are these half brothers. with billy carter you had. johnson had samuel johnson, the estranged brothers. we're lucky he doesn't have any strange family aspect. >> well, he does. >> not in this country. >> in kenya. >> a new rule for families. thank you, eugene robinson, for that joy. joy reid, michael steele. howard fineman and i'll be right back with another hour live edition of "hardball." "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, krischris, and thank you for tuning in. we're covering this amazing, historic day in washington. the inauguration of barack obama as our president. right now, the president and the vice president are watching the inaugural parade with groups from all over the country going by and standing in front of the white house. just moments ago, the airmen passed by and got a standing ovation. earlier today, the president gave his second inaugural address, a stirring, passionate call for equality and fairness. forging a more perfect union and helping the country live up to the meaning of its creed. >> we, the
is the day that 40 years ago today, lyndon johnson died. i think he would have recognized and probably admired that speech yesterday very much. and i think one way of understanding it is to look at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me,
in the nation's capital with estimates ranging as high as 1.9 million people. until then, lyndon johnson held the record crowd of 1.2 million in 1965. attendance for president obama's second inauguration is projected to be lower than his first. president george w. bush's second inaugural in 2005 drew up to 500,000 people.>> it may be sot before we get the official estimate of the crowd here, certainly not 1.8 million who were here in 2009, but estimates before the inauguration ranged from 600,000 to 800,000 but what we can report to you is that there were a lot of americans in the national mall today who were overjoyed to witness history, inauguration of any president is a remarkable moment in american history. and they were there today, many of them with their children to see these events. the president was inaugurated of course under the -- in the shadow i probably should say, the capitol dome. a fascinating thing about the dome of the capitol, this year is the 150th anniversary of the completion of the capitol dome. something that was mentioned today during the president's inauguration. h
-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
" jennifer steinhauer and fawn johnson. let me begin with the comments made this past week as the president outlined his gun strategy. he made a passing reference to violent in media. you said you want to take a closer look at that part of the debate. how can congress legislate morality when it comes to gun violence or movies? >> movies and television and what not the response and not the congress. it to be family members, parents. with my grandchildren there are programs that are not allowed to watch. i think that is right. we should be doing more of that. the industry has to ask itself how glamorous do they make killings, the same in a movie. there's nothing glamorous about somebody being killed. i was at a number of murder scenes when i was a prosecutor. there's nothing glamorous about that. i worry about people glamorizing it. the issue has been raised. we will ask about it. i do not think anybody in the senate has worked harder to defend the first amendment. i do not see a law that will ban of these things. >> after the president announced his initiative and things like to see happen i
or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i think we saw the president saying, what he's wanted to say for 10 years. and republicans as a result, really back on their heels. republicans now may not get anything from this president in the next three clips. this is not a president who's getting ready to cave or to make a deal with them. starting tomorrow, they're going to try to get back on the offensive. tomorrow, they're going to introduce their bill, vote on their bil
johnson, was in power. this president has made no secret of his ambition to be the fourth transformative president. and the question is, will he, in his speech today, show a kind of combative nature that led to franklin roosevelt's overreaching and historic change of the politics of the country? >> you see the congressional leaders for the country. steny hoyer, and we just saw them go to the capitol. >> we saw janet napolitano, and security making their way in. you were talking about lincoln in the course of this presidency. i want to pick up the pictures of him because they are among the most startling. he lost 50 pounds. he was about 150 pounds weighing in, at 6'4". >> the picture on the right side, abraham lincoln, only 56 years old. look at those eyes. of course, the lincoln memorial there. martin luther king in the shadow, gave that speech 50 years ago. and there, we see, as you see more -- i think that's katy perry there. >> i believe it is. >> on the steps of the capitol. along with john mayer. we're going to come back. she performed at the kids' concert saturday night. we're goin
tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ male announcer ] end your long week... with a weekend getaway. save up to forty percent on all weekend hotel stays. book by january thirty first at hiltonanyweekend.com. >>> good morning. our "starting point" this morning a powerful admission, lance armstrong reporting telling oprah he doped for years after denying it over and over again and tarnishing his reputation, will his admission work and what about the timing of all this? why is he coming clean now? the white house considers new gun proposal so look at what could be on the table and how the president could toughen up laws that already exist. >>> as washington gears up to duke it out over the debt ceiling, should we scrap it all together? what fed chief ben bernanke is saying, hmm, something to consider. >>> she is the newest miss america, new york's mallory hagan is here live, we'll talk to her about her surprising views about guns in school. >> it's tuesday, january 15th and "starting point" begins right now. our
. and finally, when he supports social security, medicaid and medicare, that's straight lyndon johnson, great society talk. this is a speech in the progressive tradition. at some points it's like the second inaugural of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that'
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
of the democratic party. and yet it set in motion the events that led to the challenging of lyndon johnson. so i think unfortunately history becomes political, and we pick and choose what we refer to emphasize, but dr. king was gradual. he was slow to come to an open stance. he knew what the stakes were. he wasn't unaware. he wasn't innocent. he knew he would have trouble taking that position, and he took it forthrightly, and proudly, and stayed with it. >> john: kris let me ask you the same question. do you think that another great tragedy of dr. king's loss is he's only remembered as a civil rights icon and not as a non-violent resistence icon or labor rights icon. >> he's so much bigger than the box we tend to put him in. in some of those speeches, in the antiwar speeches he was talking about moving beyond tribe, race, class and nation. that's the kind of radical internationalism that we really don't talk about. even president obama's speech today he's saying we're really loyal not to party but to nations. well, king went far beyond that and say we're not loyal to nations. we're loyal to god.
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
tim johnson, democrat of south dakota, "it makes common sense to not have one size fits all. senator mark begich, democrat of alaska, "i feel like it's going to be hard for they of these pieces of legislation to pass at this point." these are democrats. what is he going to bring to bear on that? >> it is a tough issue. i will say this, these are commonsense proposals that respect the rights of gun owners. let's start there. and i think if you look at high-capacity magazines, assault weapons, universal background checks, the progress we can make on mental health and school safety, all of these enjoy enormous support of the american people. democrats and republicans, so i think that putting together the legislative coalition is going to be hard obviously but we're very confident. i do think things have changed since newtown, you know, senator manchin and republicans and democrats are thinking anew about this issue. >> but senator harry reid, the democratic leader in the senate, and those senators i just mentioned all signaling that the assault weapons ban is not likely to get through a
tax and repeal the 16th amendment? and go to a fair tax like libertarian gary johnson promoted in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
, the first president to actually ride in a bulletproof car was lyndon johnson in 1965, michael shure. the first president to ride in a car at all, excuse me, david shuster, are you there? the first president to ride in a ceremony in a car was warren harding back in 1921. so shuster, can you see from where you are. you've got a unique spot looking back at the capitol. can you see any of that happening? >> yeah, we can see over to constitution avenue. can see the crowds blocked off. we can see the monitor. what i wanted to say about the motorcade is a couple of things. first of all, in order to prepare pennsylvania avenue for this path, they removed something like 25 different stoplights that were on poles and the other thing that they do as part of security is early this morning, the electric company and gas company will go manhole cover by manhole cover, prop them open, make sure nothing is underneath and put a little x of spray paint and we would it shut. they know that pennsylvania avenue has been cleared. so it is a fascinating process to get pennsylvania ready for this motorcade.
johnson. that's true. >> anybody compared to bill clinton and lyndon johnson -- not going to change really in that sense. he is who he is. he doesn't want to appear to be inauthentic about it. one of the things about bill clinton was he was what i call an authentic phony. everybody believed what he was saying at the moment. barack obama always had more difficult time trying to act that up. but as he said the other day, you know, he is a nice enough guy. echoed what he said about hillary. nice enough, too. >> that line didn't go over so well the first time. >> he was talking about himself a little easier maybe. >> maybe. but do -- does he enjoy politics? >> yes. well, he enjoys politics but enjoys other things as well. you know, i -- i think that he -- he's learning how to really sort of merge that with the other aspects of what he enjoys which is policy and rest of life. >> can i say two words? joe biden. that's what joe biden is for. he does the things the president really dislikes doing. i mean, it is -- if the president doesn't like to glad hand and hang out with members of congress, th
of war is -- jay johnson, the general kuns counsel of the pentagon, gave a speech about thinking about ending that war. we think about iraq and afghanistan. the hot wars. boots on the grounds wars. the broader framework of war under which we labor through the amf i agree with you the odds are slim that we're going to see a repeal of that, an end to that, but i think it's a place for the conversation to go in the second term as the president headed towards withdrawal with afghanistan and the physical presence we have of u.s. soldiers. >> as we start to understand what an obama foreign policy is. i mean, you look back at the first inaugural just compared with the second inaugural address. the first inaugural address was about ending the era of bush and cheney. that's really what it was about. it was about we're going to do this in i different way. if you unclench your fist. it's a different time now. he has to figure out what he is going to do affirmatively, not in reaction to the way somebody else did it that he disapproved of. >> look at the change in personnel. to go from gates to hil
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)